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suggested that booker was a bit of a civil rights icon? >> yes. >> a family secret locked on a forgotten piece of film. >> night after night i lay down and i don't want my children to go after -- >> explosive then. haunting now. >> i said they could come and kill you. he said i want to be heard. >> raw words with great risk and great power to change. >> my heart broke for him. i didn't realize how much jeopardy he was putting himself in. >> tonight, a journey back in time to unlock a mystery. >> who's this guy booker wright? >> and uncover truth. >> if you're willing to tell the truth we can find a place. >> finding booker's place. >>> welcome to "dateline," everyone. i'm lester holt. what do you know about your ancestors? a lot of us might not know much before our grandparents. the young woman in tonight's story didn't even know that. she started a search and crossed paths with a hollywood producer on a mission of his own. their journey took them to the deep south during the battle for civil rights. on an old film, an nbc documentary, they uncovered an explosive family secret. that is n
community activists, civil rights activists, that looked like me, that looked like many of us. and then in the newspapers i saw two asians and they were speaking always passionately about asian american civil rights. well, they were professor ling chee wang and henry durham. and when i was actually quite despairing, i was quite despairing, it was coming down it a crucial vote in 2007 and then 2008 for the college board to support this campus, they came to the fore, they organized the community, the community rose up probably one of the first few times in the history of the chinese community in san francisco, they rose up from the ground and they said, we want this campus, we're fighting for this campus and you better vote for this campus, and guess what, we passed it and we got the campus. so this campus has been built and raised and all of us community activists, ling chee wang, all you old-timers, we built it for current generations and generations as yell yet unborn. our forefathers came hear to build the railroads. they came hear to build the railroads but really to build
't about any one religious belief. it's about protecting the civil right to make a lifelong commitment to the person you love. join me in supporting question 6. it's the right thing to do. >>> we want you to take a look at the time lapse that we got. this is 59th and the bay in maryland. as the night fell you can see the rains come and then they picked up. watch as daybreaks and you see the water taking on. well, there's one and that's where it stops. there's one carcinoma see bo to the right and it's broken off and at a complex and this is the island and this is theirs and a lot of people go and listen to the 18th over which are. getting the name right. it's as the sun set goes down. 44 minutes ago officially. if anybody sees it, please point it in the direction of home. it appears that it has broken off into the bay. just a traffic city and we're on lock down as everybody is because the water is coming in from all directions and the ocean is pouring into down by the inland on to the coastal highway and the bay as we have seen from 2:00 this afternoon it had reached 33 street and in t
's about protecting the civil right to make a lifelong commitment to the person you love. join me in supporting question 6. it's the right thing to do. >>> welcome back. it is 6:00 here this morning. we are watching hurricane sandy very closely for you this morning. good morning. i'm sarah simmons. >> i'm wisdom martin. a very busy morning indeed. tucker barnes will have the latest information as soon as we get it. >> before we talk with him, first the warnings about this storm are being taken very seriously. >> there is a long list of what is closed today. metro is closed today. that includes all rail, bus and metro access service. the federal government is also closed. d.c. government offices or closed as well and so are most schools across it is region. >> for a full list of closures gorks to myfoxdc.com. we are also running all the closures on the top of your screen. -- for a full list of closures, go to myfoxdc.com. >> tucker, can you at least -- i know you are very busy over there. here, we have a picture it was right now. what is the latest on this? >> so, we're now looking
for equal opportunity. he focuses on legal issues arising from civil rights laws including the regulatory impact on business and the problems in higher education created by affirmative action. a former deputy assistant attorney general and of ronald reagan and bush of administrations, he held the second highest positions in both the civil rights division and the environment and natural resources division. he has held several other positions in the justice department including the assistant to the solicitor general, associate deputy attorney general, and acting assistant attorney general in the office of legal policy degette ki is a graduate of yale law school. please welcome roger. [applause] >> thank you very much for that nice introduction and for inviting me today. thank you to the cato institute and rick and stuart writing this wonderful book. i am going to begin by keeping praise on rick and stuart for this book to be it's terrific. it makes an extraordinary contribution to the debate on these issues. i think it's unprecedented my contribution in many ways. i've read the book, and it
as a criminal prosecutor, a civil rights attorney, founder of a small business, and volunteered as chair of both the neighborhood association and an affordable housing organization. when i was elected four years ago, i promised to bring people together to deliver results, to increase cooperation and accountability at city hall. over the past four years, i'm proud of what we have=hvj÷ accomplishedpj9n together, focug on what matters, to deliver for our dim0]czdñ 3 neighborhoods, again and again. now, we've been creating jobsm with waterfront projects to open the new exploratorium, cruise ship terminal, america's campus, a chinese hospital. we're been keeping families in our city by rebuilding the recreation center, playgrounds all over the district, we've been supporting small businesses, cutting small business fees, red tape, and championing business tax reform on the november ballot. when proposition e passes so that we end our tax on jobs rather than on profits, our local merchants, our restaurants, cafes and shops will be able to hire more people. we've been building affordable housing for
. >> in addition to running his own grocery, sylvester also operates tours of significant blues and civil rights spots in the area. >> a lot of people are making money off it. i'm probably the only black doing it. >> this is one of the stops on sylvester's tour. it is what remains of the grocery store where emmitt till whistled at a white woman. that night he was abducted from his bed, brutally murdered, and tossed into the river. the property is owned by one of the jurors that acquitted till's killers. he wants to have a memorial here but can't because the owner has a seven figure asking price. >> everybody trying to make money off the blues and civil rights. and a lot of those people gave us the blues but now they making money off the blues. it don't taste good to a lot of people, but they doing it. >> as for ray de felitta and yvette johnson, work on their film wrapped earlier this year. >> why he spoke that way in the film -- >> "booker's place: a mississippi story" premiered in april at the tribeca film festival. >> beautiful. >> for frank and ray de felitta, it was a crowning collaboration
? he said i oppose a federal open housing law and this year i support the 1968 civil rights bill with open housing. which way will he blow next? chris: flip-flop ads were used by the two president bushes starting here with george bush 41 slamming bill clinton in 199 and then george w. bush's famous 2004 wind surfing ad against john kerry. >> presidential candidate on the left stood for military action in the persian gulf while the candidate on the right agreed with those who opposed it. one of these candidates is bill clinton. unfortunately, so is the other. in which direction would john kerry lead? kerry voted for the iraq war. opposed it. supported it. and now opposes it again. john kerry. whichever way the wind blows. chris: funny thing is the guy who made that wind surfing ad that's bush's advisor mark mckinnon worked also for john mccain in 2008. and here's the recycled hand he work for mccain against primary opponent mitt romney. >> mitt romney seems to change positions like the wind. he tells florida he supports the bush tax cuts. but as massachusetts governor romney refus
then libertarians blew up his campaign when he gave the libertarian answer on the 1964 civil rights act. suddenly he was tendering on that, john stossel. john: let's play some clips. romney says he will repeal obamacare. but he wants to keep the popular parts. >> numbeone, pre-existing conditions are covered under my plan. john: that's popular. no one likes the idea that pre-existing conditions are covered, but that is not insurance, that is welfare. >> this is what our entire segment should beyond. of simply blowing off your obsession with drug legalization. health care. if we did not repeal obamacare in the next few years. john: repeal it but tepee expensive parts. cover the kids. >> 1,000 yearsf darkness. this is why you have to vote, i don't care if it's mickey mouse. or big bird. [laughter] but romney is far more free market than any recent republican candidates, including george bush. what romney is talking about here is the free-market. and as you say, pre-existing conditions are popular, like big bird. john: if everybody has to cover pre-existing conditions. >> let me finish. no one said eve
religious belief. it's about protecting the civil right to make a lifelong commitment to the person you love. join me in supporting question 6. it's the right thing to do. >>> you can some in and get a close look at your neighborhood or zoom out and get a wide view, a scope of how grand this hurricane is. so that's one aspect of it. of course the pictures that we can't be everywhere, and we want you to help us out and get your mobile devices out, snap photos and click on the submit feature on the fox 5 weather app. once you do that you'll have applicants is to your own gallery of photos on your smartphones. you can up load it. this is a look at one of the photos right now that has been sent in. this is damage in ocean city on the boardwalk, some of the bench that report delay were bolted to the ground were strewn. you can -- how about that photo of walmart in centreville? if you look closely a lot of shelves will be empty with food and water. if you look this is ammunition, folks getting ready for any scenario. feel free to download that weather app at d.c. weather. you can submit photos by
during the missile crisis, but in everything he does, whether it's vietnam policy, tax policy, civil rights, constantly thinking about how will this play out and how is this going to look? i would very carefully draw the distinction between that and partisan politics in a superficial sense. i do not believe he was partisan in the superficial sense that we like to talk about that was a political decision and things like that, and a lot of the time -- we mean that superficially as a partisan way, but in a much deeper way, i think he was absolutely aware of the political ramifications, but it just wasn't -- he was careful, for instance, to brief dwight eisenhower, at that point, one the leading republican figures, gave him special briefings in the crisis, called him on the tfn, we have those recordings. he sent the cia director, director of central intelligence, john mccohen, tight in republican party politics at this point, sent him to brief eisenhower. whenever there were -- he was briefing congressional leaders, it was a bipartisan affair, not getting democratic leaders on the phone
in the missile crisis that everything he does with its the it non-policy, civil rights, he's constantly thinking about how is this going to play out? but i would draw the distinction between that and partisan politics in a superficial sense. i argue in the book they do not believe that he was partisan and the super said delete a superficial sense we dhaka that there was a political decision and things like that and a lot of the time we mean that very superficially but in a deeper way i think that he was absolutely aware of the ramifications but he was very careful for instance to brief the white eisenhower who at the plant was one of the leading republican takers and he gave him special briefings during the crisis and called him up on the telephone. he was sending john mccallum, the cia director of the center of intelligence come he would send john, who was very tight in the republican politics at this point, she would send him to advise. whenever there were -- he was reading the congressional leaders a was a bipartisan. he wasn't getting the democratic leaders on the phones giving them privileg
was an evangelical preacher who idolized america. >> i studied civil rights and slavery. i was so affected by an american story that was so different from the way that i had seen our country. i remember just being furious, you know. >> reporter: it's that fury and indignation that have fueled rickard's work but because he's not on the scene taking the photographs, it's also controversial. on-line viewer comments can range from compelling and fascinating work to... >> this guy says lazy, pathetic and entirely uninteresting. so it's all over the board. people have commented that i'm not even a photographer. >> of course it's photography. yeah, i think that what doug is doing is looking through the... through google as part of his lens. the internet is helping redefine what it means to be a photographer. >> you see this? then you come right into here. there's damage. >> reporter: in fact, rickard says in an ocean of digital imagery creating something special is becoming more and more difficult. no matter how easy the tools are. >> i think it really boils down to what you bring to it. you know
the civil right to make a lifelong commitment to the person you love. join me in supporting question 6. it's the right thing to do. >>> straight ahead at 8:00, surviving sandy, the east coast shuts down as the deadly superstorm moves closer from school closings to storm surges, we have you covered with live team coverage all morning long. good morning everybody, i'm tony perkins. >> i'm allison seymour. right now, the storm is making its way up the east coast, poised for a district hit on the mid-atlantic tonight. >> in preparation of that, states of emergency have been declared from virginia to massachusetts, and president obama has promised a quick federal response. experts say sandy could impact some 50 million people up and down the east coast. it is already blamed for the deaths of 65 after sweeping through the caribbeans. >> now here at home, officials aren't taking any chances. >> that's because most schools in the region are closed, so is the federal government and the dc city government. you can see the full list of delays scrolling at the top of your screen and online at myfoxdc.
civil rights were worth fighng for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) san fransco as the repubn aron party nvenes tnomina i choice for president >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt trav with hidedad watch him take on consvaveatat republan senat barry ldwa >> the rublican y sh unuivoy repudiat trem of thght and , and the eorts infate or a ehh selves tr pay its candidates. >> mit absorbing all o sees his fa basical taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barrys goldwater's convention. >> i would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice. (cwd cheers) >> nrator: and when water received the nomination, mitt saw his father angrily storm out. >> i think that my father was
that government has certain basic responsibilities by guaranteeing civil rights and searching for ways to live peacefully in the world. it means choosing dialogue over blame respect over division hope over fear. what made george a great public servant was not only his compassion and his integrity but it was his uncommon vision. he saw connections others did not see. like the connection between little civility and hungry children. that vision became good for peace and a mcgovern dole international food education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962 he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term, he gave his first speech on vietnam. in 1970, he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels and in 1984 he urged all of our american leadership to understand the complexity, the challenges and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america will be a better place had george become
, departments, and to the public. the city email conversion project. i know that the civil grand jury points that as a failure or a ongoing frustration. i think we see some of the recent success and progress we're optimistic. right now 3600 users, 27 departments and some of the largest departments are slated for conversion in the next months and library is slated for conversion and additional 1300 accounts and others in january. our largest department with another 7100 accounts. data center consolidation and virtualization has been so successful that the scope has been expanded. initially the project was to convert or relocate 900 servers and 750 have been virtualized and 400 identified as candidates and 300 additional for relocation and total of 1400 servers, much larger than the originally scope of the project. this is also a sign of collaboration among the departments and one of the data center is housed at the airport and not in our department of technology. enterprise agreements have recently been completed with bm ware and adobe and projected to save the city money over the next
in investigating. it's not the "new york times'" job to do the work of human rights and civil liberty groups. that got me thinking. well, then, whose job is it? if it's not the times', and you shut out plaintiffs in the information; that leaves a vacuum, and i thought the responsible thing would be to fill it by the government opposed to law professors and centers for national security. as i said in the beginning, i agree with john that the debate is not in any significant regard different in as far as the tensions what's been really for the better part of the better part of the last 70 years, but i think that we are leaning more towards a lack of public accountability than i'm comfortable with, and, you know, maybe that's just because i'm a, you know, a law professor not in the trenches like these guys. >> it's uncomfortable to talking about the pendulum swing back when the actual accountability for so much that has happened has not occurred, and the question has been left to the ngos, the think tanks, the press to sort of figure out, well, who exactly is responsible for braining that accou
doesn't make sense. charles: the notion of a more civil tone within the discourse could be the overarching message. >> it is a funny start. charles: you're right about kid rock saying a lot of things the majority of americans, but i would not put the deer on the front. that was weird. the highlight reel is next. charles: we have some breaking news. think about this. the labor department saying they have not made a decision on whether to delay friday's jobs report. that is huge. the next number will be revised higher. there is no way that number was real. what if all this economic data is pushed past the election. >> that is exceedingly rare for the labor department to delay or even discussed delaying it. talking about how hurricane sandy may lower gdp which is already getting along at 2%. we could go into negative territory. they are saying sizable negative impact from hurricane sandy. watch out for that. >> plus, what this could do to consumer confidence. the confidence index, this could really affect it. playing with this politically, bad for the obama administration.
, and that was basically a number of people representing the different religious and civil institutions in the country. this group of people, together, they issued a number of very important documents relating to citizenship and how the most important element in the future of egypt was the right of citizenship for every egyptian respective of race, irrespective of religion, irrespective of wealth of the this was a country that we were going to build for all our citizens, and then there was a number of -- another important document that was produced, and that was relating to the basic rights, like, the rights -- the right to believe in whatever form you want. the right to express yourself. the right to be creative, and now they are working on a third document which is related to women's issues in general so these groups are both religious and civil society groups who came together in order to point the way for the future, and this is particularly important for two reasons. first, out of the revolution, we have a people that's been empowered. a people that feels that, and i call it the "revolution," and
to be on health benefits. and i believe civil unions should be acceptable so they should have these rights. but this is between a man and woman. i believe two people that want to make that commitment it should be marriage. that's why the human rights campaign gave me their endorsement >> do you think it's a moderate district? >> it is a moderate district. i think it's more fiscally conservative and socially moderate. . >> i know the majority of my district supports marriage quality and employment non-discrimination act yet mr. dole opposes that. >> let's go to another question and the question is for mr. insider. >> why vnlt you released your tax return? >> the voters want to know what i've owned even our kids savings accounts are included with the report i filed. >> what do you pay in terms of tax rates? >> that's been reported in the papers as well. my wife has her own career. she has employees and clients and competitors. she's not running for congress. i believe my wife has a certain degree of privacy. everything voters want to know about my finances is in the report. >> they're entitl
, nothing to do with civil rights. grant was the last of the lincoln republicans. one point i make is grant was the only president between lincoln and johnson who took civil rights for african-americans at all seriously, and after grant left office, the african-american -- the former slaves were simply left to the tender mercies of the white majorities of the south, and quickly, they were shoved to the side of politics. >> okay. don't ask a question if you don't want bill to answer it thoroughly. [laughter] >> i accept yes, no, and multiple choice questions. [laughter] >> we have just three minutes left, and it's a serious deadline. you have to ask a brief question and see what answer we can get out of bill. >> i hope so. you said once youmented to write american history through biography. when i read the binge min frankly biographers, he was the prototypical american, modern in some sense. who -- having once been to england, i saw different people, even though they speak english. who was the first american in the sense that he has or she has attitudes like we do on any plans of writing a b
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)